Awakening the senses (10 min)

Awakening the senses (10 min)

Taking a pause and connecting to our senses in the middle of a busy day can help boost our energy levels and improve our focus and motivation. During this practice we will cycle through the different senses and at the end you might find that you feel more alive and energized.

Loving kindness practice (23 min)

Loving kindness practice (23 min)

The capacity to love that is inherent in every one of us can be awakened and developed through the practice of loving kindness or Metta, which is a 2,500-year-old practice. It is meant to cultivate a state of mind that radiates kindness, wishing well without wanting anything in return. It uses repeated phrases, images and feelings to evoke loving kindness and friendliness towards oneself and others. Traditionally, we begin with ourselves and continue opening our hearts to eventually include all beings.

Connecting with your heart’s compass (18 min)

Connecting with your heart’s compass (18 min)

In order to answer those questions “what matters most to me, what is my deepest intention to practice, or am I following a path with heart?”, the first step is to quiet the body and mind, to come into presence, so we can become still and listen deeply, to let the answer come to us.

Peace and equanimity practice (20 min)

Peace and equanimity practice (20 min)

Equanimity is the ability the remain composed and balanced even in the face of challenges. It is based on a deep and compassionate understanding of the changing nature of life. Equanimity is a sustained state of balance, seeing what’s here with evenness of mind, a mind that is touched by life but unbroken by its ever-changing nature. This practice is inspired by the meditation teacher Jack Kornfield.

Strong back, soft front (10 min)

Strong back, soft front (10 min)

The back is a physical metaphor that points to your natural capacity to uphold yourself in the midst of difficulties, to be balanced, to hold all beings and things in equal regard. And this is called equanimity, your ability to be present whatever is happening in any given moment. This short practice is inspired by Roshi Joan Halifax.

Compassion practice for yourself and the world (25 min)

Compassion practice for yourself and the world (25 min)

This is a meditation on compassion using our breath and our heart. The foundation of this practice is to breathe in pain and suffering and to breathe out compassion. For this we begin to imagine ourselves as a “flow through”: the breath comes in, we breathe in the suffering into our heart, and then our heart becomes a transformer of sorrows. As we breathe out compassion, we imagine the suffering moving out into a larger space that can hold it all.
As we practice, we start to develop what the Tibetans call the “Lion’s roar”, which is a sense of confidence that we can handle the suffering of this life. It’s the sense that whatever happens, there is room in our heart for it. We don’t need to tense for what’s to come, we can relax and enjoy our moments, because there is room for them. We cultivate a heart that is ready for anything.

Welcoming Joy (20 min)

Welcoming Joy (20 min)

As we learn to become more present to each moment, and to pay attention to what’s here inside us and around us, we can be touched by all the moments of joy and love that happen in our lives: a corner of blue sky on a winter day, the song of birds in the morning, the clear laughter of a child, the kindness of a stranger…
Even in the middle of all our fears and worries, we can still learn to stop and notice these little moments of joy and happiness, and to make space for them.

Self-compassion practice (20 min)

Self-compassion practice (20 min)

Self-compassion is often a radically new way of relating to ourselves. With self-compassion we mindfully accept that the moment is painful, and embrace ourselves with kindness and care in response, remembering that imperfection is part of the shared human experience. This allows us to hold ourselves in love and connection, giving ourselves the support and comfort needed to bear the pain, while providing the optimal conditions for growth and transformation. This practice is adapted from the work of Kristin Neff on self-compassion.

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join Emmanuelle Dal Pra mailing list to receive the latest news and updates.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join Emmanuelle Dal Pra mailing list to receive the latest news and updates.

You have Successfully Subscribed!