Article on practicing Self-Care in stressful times

Article on practicing Self-Care in stressful times

Self-care is simply taking care of ourselves, every day, nurturing our well-being by listening to our deepest needs and responding in some caring and compassionate way. Self-care helps us look after our physical and mental health so we can cope better during stressful times. For me any self-care practice starts with pausing, following the invitation of the meditation teacher Tara Brach who asks us: what would it be like if right in the midst of all our busyness and stress we were to consciously take our hands off the controls? What if we were to intentionally stop our mental computations and rushing around and, for a minute or two, simply pause and notice our experience?

In honour of Thich Nhat Hanh

In honour of Thich Nhat Hanh

This article was written in honour of the Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hahn who died on 22nd January 2022, aged 95. Often referred to as “the father of mindfulness”, his simple yet deeply profound teachings have led countless people towards a life of mindfulness, joy, and peace.

Positive neuroplasticity and the practice of taking in the good

Positive neuroplasticity and the practice of taking in the good

The best way to compensate for our negativity bias and build our inner strengths is to regularly take in the good, as described by the psychologist and meditation Rick Hanson. The practice of taking in the good is a systematic approach that allows us to deliberately internalize our positive experiences into implicit memory, so that they can start to have an impact on neural structure in our brain.

Article on Finding Refuge in your Awakened Heart

Article on Finding Refuge in your Awakened Heart

“Be a lamp unto yourself, be a refuge to yourself. Take yourself to no external refuge.” – The Buddha
What did he mean? Our ultimate refuge is none other than our own being. There is a light of awareness that shines through each of us and guides us home. We are never separated from this luminous awareness any more than waves are separated from the ocean. Even when we feel most ashamed or lonely, reactive or confused, we are never actually apart from the awakened state of our heart-mind.
This is a wonderful and beautiful teaching. For all of us, this open, loving awareness is our deepest nature. – Tara Brach, True Refuge

Article on finding our inner resources

Article on finding our inner resources

Discovering a way to contact positive emotions, and especially a sense of care, strength, stability and safety in the present moment, is a key element in healing.
If we know how to develop an inner refuge where we feel loved and safe, it enables us to reduce the intensity of difficult emotions when they arise during our meditation practice, and in our day-today life. New associations, new inner resources, and new ways of coping and understanding begin to emerge spontaneously.
Most of all, it enables us to grow a sense of trust in ourselves, to know that we have within us whatever is needed to be present with our life.

Transforming our thoughts with mindfulness

Transforming our thoughts with mindfulness

Mindfulness includes the capacity to remember, remembering what is happening right now, and also remembering what is skilful and what is unskilful in the mind, so that we are better able to discern what qualities of mind bring about suffering in our lives, for ourselves and others, and what states of mind bring about happiness, peace for ourselves and others, this is the broader meaning of mindfulness. both in our meditation and in our lives.

Opening to loving awareness

Opening to loving awareness

“Meditation is a deep listening with the body, heart and mind to find graciousness, wisdom and ease amidst all the change around us. We can invite a sense of calm and steadiness with each breath. We can become the loving awareness that is tuning into our heart and listens deeply.” – Jack Kornfield

Article on mindfulness of the body

Article on mindfulness of the body

“There is one thing that, when cultivated and regularly practiced, leads to deep spiritual intention, to peace, to mindfulness and clear comprehension, to vision and knowledge, to a happy life here and now, and to culmination of wisdom and awakening. And what is that one thing? It is mindfulness centered on the body.” – The Buddha

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