Article: Connecting with your heart’s compass

Article: Connecting with your heart’s compass

Buddhist tradition teaches that all of life is precious. As we learn to bring our full attention to life through our practice, and the quality of presence grows is us, we start to feel our love for the whole of life, for our planet and beings, and this love begins to permeate more and more our actions and our life.

Article on Compassionate Presence

Article on Compassionate Presence

Introduction There is a lot of suffering in the world right now, and also difficult things happening in our lives, and this is all present here, the world suffering and our own individual suffering. And it can be very difficult for us to know how to be and how to...

Article – Bringing a healing attention to our emotions

Article – Bringing a healing attention to our emotions

Introduction When we sit down to meditate, all sorts of emotions will arise. Emotions and feelings that we might have not allowed ourselves to feel fully and acknowledge will present themselves: pain from past traumas, early childhood and family pain, grief from...

Article on Helpful Reminders for Practice

Article on Helpful Reminders for Practice

At the first Mind Life conference in 1987, the Dalai Lama was asked by a journalist what was the happiest moment of his life. He was silent for a while and then he gave a mischievous look and said, "I think now". And this is really the essence of the training in...

Article on learning to let things be

Article on learning to let things be

Cultivating the attitude of letting go or non-attachment is fundamental to the practice of mindfulness. But our conditioning is to hold on to things: we hold on to our experiences, the way things are supposed to be, beliefs, material goods, our ideas of what we think life is about. Letting go is not easy. Meditation practice can help us to find composure and resilience in the midst of all the changes in our life. It helps us see that everything passes and that we can rest in the midst of change.

Article on practicing Self-Care in stressful times

Article on practicing Self-Care in stressful times

Self-care is simply taking care of ourselves, every day, nurturing our well-being by listening to our deepest needs and responding in some caring and compassionate way. Self-care helps us look after our physical and mental health so we can cope better during stressful times. For me any self-care practice starts with pausing, following the invitation of the meditation teacher Tara Brach who asks us: what would it be like if right in the midst of all our busyness and stress we were to consciously take our hands off the controls? What if we were to intentionally stop our mental computations and rushing around and, for a minute or two, simply pause and notice our experience?

In honour of Thich Nhat Hanh

In honour of Thich Nhat Hanh

This article was written in honour of the Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hahn who died on 22nd January 2022, aged 95. Often referred to as “the father of mindfulness”, his simple yet deeply profound teachings have led countless people towards a life of mindfulness, joy, and peace.

Positive neuroplasticity and the practice of taking in the good

Positive neuroplasticity and the practice of taking in the good

The best way to compensate for our negativity bias and build our inner strengths is to regularly take in the good, as described by the psychologist and meditation Rick Hanson. The practice of taking in the good is a systematic approach that allows us to deliberately internalize our positive experiences into implicit memory, so that they can start to have an impact on neural structure in our brain.

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